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nba, parents were afraid i was going to drop out in pennsylvania, downtown philadelphia, strong goldwater territory. introducing barry goldwater, university of pennsylvania, robert strauss, who was 85, passed at age 102 but robert strauss was introducing it and one great political leader, i was introducing strauss who introduced goldwater. and real political indoctrination, and the young people who got this rich history, and the institutional base. and friendly competitors all around, from whom we work, americans for tax reform. they are all fair. they were not there 40 years ago. the sunday before election in 1964 the philadelphia bulletin called me and said you are the highest ranking goldwater volunteer we could find. what is going to happen in philadelphia? pretty big stuff 22 years old. i said if we lose philadelphia by a 100,000 votes barry goldwater will carry the state of pennsylvania which was probably true. we lost philadelphia by 400,000, lost the state by million. pennsylvania was not strong goldwater country. my point is that was tough politically back then. basical
politically involved back in pennsylvania, and downtown philadelphia was not strong goldwater territory. [laughter] >> really? [laughter] >> but introducing barry goldwater at the university of pennsylvania with roberts, who even then, i think, was about 85. he passed at age 102, but robert was introducing him, and these two one brilliant professor, and i'm up there to introduce goldwater, and kids in the third and fourth row threw tomatoes and eggs at us. that was not fun. [laughter] the young methamphetamine today -- people today who have rich history today and the political leaders and the institutional base, and you mentioned before some of the friendly competitors downtown like cato, aei, and others with whom we work americans for tax reform -- i'll leave somebody else but that's dangerous, but they were not there 40 years ago when we were youngsters and you were central to the goldwater camp. by the way, the sunday before election in 1964, the "philadelphia bulletin" called me saying you're the highest ranking goldwater volunteer we can find in eastern pennsylvania, what's going t
: with massachusetts or pennsylvania as a case study of states regulating religion. >> pennsylvania had been active blasphemy law that we would now think of as unconstitutional and the last case, the last gallup -- criminal prosecution was in the early 1970's by accident again someone who had a sign in his window that said wanted radical carpenter speaking piece of they thought it was blasphemous and the aclu got involved quickly and the prosecution was dropped. more recently the film company owner tried to name his company i choose hal productions and was denied and corporation under the laws because it was blasphemous. and that eventually was dismissed. >>host: why did it start to change in the air of the 20th century? >> i think especially with the growth of the federal government with the new deal era, the other was the embrace of migration and pluralism that it began to use sees a little bit after the early 20th centuries and the new deal forced so many people on to the move looking for work, having much greater contact with government and the expansion of government power highlighted the fric
>> next, booktv interview the university of pennsylvania has, richard gelles about his book, "the third lie." in the book, professor gelles argues that social programs don't work and suggest a different approach. this is about 10 minutes. >> well, booktv is on the road. we are in philadelphia at the university of pennsylvania interviewing some professors who also happen to be authors. they want to introduce you to the dean of the university of pennsylvania school of social policy and practice. this is richard gelles on your screen. one of his books, his most recent is called "the third lie: why government programs don't work- and a blueprint for change." dr. gelles, i am here from the government and i'm here to help you. is that not true? just could not true. >> host: why not? >> guest: because most social government programs designed to help people don't help. in some instances it is little more, i hate saying this, but the do-gooder full employment act that provides lots of jobs to people who would like to help, but at the end of the day if you look at whether the needle has bee
blocked. light volume. pennsylvania avenue, woodyard road, overnight construction. nih, on thea near southbound side, one lane getting by. in light volume. road eachcanal direction between arizona and the chain bridge. that should be done by 5:00. we are good on va 95 up to the beltway. back to you. >> thank you. inwant to get to new details monday's deadly bombing at the boston marathon. police are searching an apartment in a boston suburb. >> massachusetts state police will only tell us that a search warrant related to the investigation has been served. tahman bradley has a latest. >> this morning the city of boston is on heightened alert to 1124 hours after terror erupted. thousands were celebrating patriots' day and running the boston marathon when a few yards from the finish line at 2: 50 p.m. the first bomb exploded. >> multiple people down here. stand by. the whitensued among smoke. then another explosion seconds later. three people killed including an eight-year-old boy. more than 140 injured. it's i saw the smoke and then everybody running everywhere. >> i saw quite a few ca
along the border with pennsylvania and new york. one allows it to take place, while the other does not. recently i traveled there to see the divide. in rural pennsylvania they are drilling for gas. hydraulic fracturing bush's high pressure water into the rock to release valuable gas. opportunitiesht to the town. people made money it leasing to gas companies, and now the workers have arrived. business elite by 25%. >> it really improve my business. it brought a lot of people into the area. the people say, we have no idea what we are in store for. hopefully they are right. frakking creates dust and noise in the town in contrast to the beauty of the mountains. this bed-and-breakfast is led by eleanor, who has seen people cashing in by leasing their land. >> you are happy for your neighbor, but their good fortune ruin the hills,ano and the trees. >> it is time to spend a pay check from drilling for gas. >> once we get the pipeline done it is going to boost the economy. there is nothing here. >> it has brought more with the businesses and the people who rent have done very well. >> what has
. [laughter] >> we have a governor of pennsylvania on the next panel, maybe he'll offer something. >> another question, why should investors be confident when debt levels are higher than that in the great depression? >> one more time? >> why should investors be confident when economic policies unpredictable and debt levels higher than that in the great depression. >> robert, that's for you. >> sounds like it's for me too. investors are confident because they are so exhausted from the policy whirlwinds we've been through where the good economic policy has political points of view so it seems like we're in a calm, stable period right now, and maybe the business world can get back to business, and i think it's only a relative calm. >> okay. >> jessica, final word for the panelists? >> we are out of time, thanks very much. >> all right, thank you to our panel, again, for taking questions, interesting discussion. thank you as well. [applause] some thought provoking comments there, harvey pitch well on dad-frank, registering, i'm sure with a few people in the nation's capitol, as all, thank you for
, the great state of pennsylvania is not known nationally as a bastion of social conservatism. republican tom corbett is the governor of pennsylvania. but if his name rings a bell in terms of national news attention, it may be because last yore about this time governor tom corbett was asked what he thought of a proposed republican bill that would force pennsylvania women seeking an abortion to undergo a medically unnecessary vaginal ultrasound with the ultrasound screen intentionally turned toward them. about that governor corbett offered this advice. >> wouldn't change it as long as it's not obtrusive. >> making them watch, does that go too far in your mind? >> i don't know how you make anybody watch because you just have to close your eyes. but as long as it's on the exterior, not interior. >> just close your eyes. governor tom corbett did not go on to do a whole lot of campaigning with republican presidential ticket last year, even with pennsylvania being an important swing state. he wasn't exactly driven out of the party but he is one of the least popular governors in the entire country,
of the speakers was pennsylvania governor tom corbin, talking about the issues facing the keystone state in a conversation with a bloomberg white house correspondent. >> thank you so much for joining us. this is a conversation on the state of the keystone state. so budget, pensions and energy. with the budget, you have proposed a $28.4 built budget back in february. it has to be passed by june 30, but funding is contingent on passage of changes to the state's pension system. you have called this a pension crisis. put in perspective how deep the hole is? >> the hole is very deep, and it is not just in pennsylvania. if you look at illinois, california and other states, they are facing the same thing. in pennsylvania right now we $42 out $41 billion or billion under funded. i heard that out there. decisions that were made over the last 10 years of not funding enough, making some changes to the benefit of recipients to the two pension systems at the state level -- that would be the state employees and the teachers of pennsylvania -- and then changes in the formula, and then an underperformi
would not have crayons if it were not for the crayola company of eastern pennsylvania, which is in the subject of the 68th installment of my 434-part series "better know a district." tonight, the fightin' 17th. the 17th is home to the oldest brewery in the united states, yuengling, whose name is anang lisized version of the german word jungling, which means young boy. but if you're ever in a bar and they offer you a young boy, please alert authorities immediately. ( laughter ). ( applause ) now the 17th was once home to papa bear bill o'reilly who cut his teeth as a reporter for nepwills-barry-scronton. it is there where he tested out the no spin zone, the stay still spot and lack of rotation area. and just who has the scrap toll represent this corner of pennsylvania, it's none other than first term congressman matt cartwright. i sat down with representative cartwright somewhere in the northern hemisphere. congressman thank you so much for talking to me today. >> my pleasure. i've been a big fan, stephen. >> stephen: well, the feeling is mutual? >> thank you. >> stephen: i
, the state did nothing. in pennsylvania, abortions passed 24 weeks are illegal unless the life or health of the mother is at stake. however, this doctor, gosnell, offered illegal abortions killing an unknown number of viable fetuses. his criteria wasn't the life or health of the mother but whether they could pay in cash. it's gruesome to think about, but he did it by snipping their spinal cords with a pair of scissors. he was not certified and is now on trial on eight counts of murder. he faces the death penalty. three years ago, they raided the medical center looking for drug sales. what they found when they entered that clinic was utterly horrifying. blood on the floors, a flea-infested cat moaning the halls, moaning, semi-conscious patients. the evidence presented in this grand jury report, 281 pages of it, is sickening. according to a police detective, the doctor stated that as many as 20 pnts of the fetuses he aborted were probably older than 24 weeks. page 5 of the grand jury report details the live delivery in killing of a 7 1/2 month old baby. big enough, the doctor allegedly sai
with high levels of methane found in private water supplies in the town of franklin, pennsylvania. clears the way for tracking in pennsylvania. >> i think it's important the regulations and laws on the books of things that they have to do. the epa saying that you will have a one-size-fits-all. we are doing this in ohio and north dakota and south dakota. it is completely different. answer to the constituencies. lou: speaking frankly, this is a war between the obama administrations protection agency and industry, particularly the petroleum industry, the chemical industry across this country. who is going to win it? >> the release of the american people when it. i think the american people, that jobs, over 3 million jobs, most likely, an oil and natural-gas production in this country. and when you're talking about these kind of 25-30 years ago people saying this country has energy, supplies, sitting on this vast amount of natural gas. 60,000 manufacturing jobs in my district. all these comppnies out there saying, you know what all who would love to have our trucks are not natural gas, so let
toomey, from my sister state of pennsylvania and west virginia we're side by side. we come from states that have deep-rooted cultures, as you know, and we believe very strongly in that. i also want to give special thanks to two people who weren't here today who have been invaluable to this process and have worked from the beginning trying to find common ground and that is senator chuck schumer, my good friend, mark kirk. mark has never left. chuck and his staff and all of them that worked so hard, i thank everybody. the staffs do yeomen's job. i also want to thank tom coburn. tom has been invaluable to the process. also coming from the culture we come from and have great input all the way through this process. thent to make it clear from start that this is a start and this is not the end of our work. we still have a lot to do. we have an agreement, pat and i have an agreement with senator kirk and senator schumer. we have an agreement on an amendment to prevent criminals and the mentally ill and insane from getting firearms and harming people. that's extremely important for all of us.
day parade, roads s are closed along pennsylvania avenue. if you see a sposhe suspicious k see something, say something. se that's the check of fox 5 on time traffic. >>> thank you, julie. >>> we begin with the latestlate develop tell us out odevelopmen. >>> investigators spent thestigr nighs t searching an apartment n the eastside of revere. a search warrant related to thee bombs has been served. se >>> the fbi is leading the investigation. the attack is being treated asi an act of terrorism.teoris a federal source confirms to fox news that a suddeny national inn the u.s. on a student visa isis being questioned but so far is not classified as a suspect. more than 140 people were injured, 17 of them critically. >> the secrecy service expanned its perimeter in and around the white house following the boston marathon explosions. there's been no direct threat.a. pennsylvania avenue was sealed off at the white house. hous the closest people can get lafayette park. park. the extra personnel can be seenn on both the ground and the roofr of the white house. hous >>> while today is ema
airport and of course, here at the white house alonghous pennsylvania avenue.pennsylvan thiae u.s. see vet service has expanned its security perimeteri but not because of any sesk intellencany specificintelligen. a secret service spokesperson saying the action taken out oftf an abundance of caution and it's not unusual for the agency to to move its security boundaries bon from time to time. meanwhile metropolitan police at d.c. have announced the department is on heightened security, though extra hours orr shifts have not been ordered yet. d.c.'se man's emancipation paras scheduled start and city city officials say it will go on as scheduled. >> come down and enjoy the the events. we have a strong security plancu in prilace. we are the nation's capital. we will have enhanced security that some will, some will not be visible to the people who come down. i want people to feel comfortable, take public publ transportation and come and enjoy the event. event we feel comfortable that it's going to be a safe event.event. >> they are telling visitors to expect lines at security entrance as they in
th streetee between pennsylvania avenue and 8th street and closures along e street and pennsylvania avenua between 14th and 12th street. that's what we're dealing with. to complicate matters accidentt activity inbound pennsylvania avenue approaching minnesota. m that has traffic squeezing by tt the left. 14th street remains open. o there's a portion of pennsylvania avenue closed off o between 14th and 12th. keep an eye out for add decisional as well. wel that's a check of your fox 5 on time traffic.ti >> we'll get the latest on the forecast of course. a lot of people outside for the parade today. >> right we're looking fine for it at least as far as rain. it's going to remain cool. we'll see sunshine pop out. a decent day. temperatures topping out in the low to top mid 70s. 58 right now in the city. dulles 58. bwi marshall 55. the temperatures are trending upward but to be honest with yon they are moving ates a slow pac. there's your cloud cover. notice it's eroding west and weeft east.t e we should see more and more sunshine working in here duringr the tuesday. t but it's not going
. >> michael, if you allocated electoral votes in pennsylvania according to congressional districts, mitt romney would have gotten most of them after the president carried the state. >> woulda, shoulda, coulda. >> i want to get to chris's bigger point. because you keep trying to say somehow or other the president ought to be blamed here. what has to be blamed here is the republican house that will not make a deal. ronald reagan made a deal on tax reform. lyndon johnson made a deal on medicare. those days are gone. any deal the president tries to make gets opposed in the house. the only way we've gotten anything passed this year, anything significant, is for john boehner to break the rule that a bill can't come to the floor without a majority of the majority. we can get out of sequestration. there are enough republican votes in the house combined with almost every democrat to pass a deal. same thing is true on immigration reform. but i don't think we're going to get any of those things if you have to have a situation where republicans as a party in the house have to all agree on this. >> l
. former congressional budget office director don marin will grade the plan coming up. ashley: pennsylvania's governor wants the keystone state out of the booze business. governor tom corbett will discuss why the move will help the economy and schools. what a day for the market after that miserable jobs report. stocks selling off on the disappointing report earlier today. nicole petallides on the well, floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole, we're off of our lows but we're still kind of in the malaise, aren't we? >> you call it a miserable jobs report and i'm sure people who are home and looking for work and not getting it are feeling pretty miserable for now as well. we saw a jobs report at 80,000, well under the estimates as a result of 200,000 jobs. here's a look what is going on here. safe haven of gold to the upside. 26 bucks. dow, nasdaq, s&p selling off. oil also lower. when you look sector to sector you're seeing down arrows across the board. when you have no job, i mean there is not going to see a booming economy. everything is interrelated for sure. look at dow one-week char
at this new ad. a new ad that's just started running. about pennsylvania republican senator pat toomey. it's targeting senator toomey, but not an ad against them. it's building him a home state practical narrative for why he ought to be on the side of reform. >> pennsylvania has a strong background check system. now the u.s. senate can pass comprehensive legislature that can stop criminals. senator toomey understands how important that change is. >> i'm in favor of making changes to a background system. call senator toomey. tell him it's time to take pennsylvania solutions to washington. >> here's the interesting thing. first, mostly, i guess it's interesting, but this is herbally a positive ad in favor of a republican senator finding a way to support reform in a way that will resonate with his home state. can we just put up on the screen the end of it, the last frame, kind of the call to action? so, lots of political issue adds end with kind of a call to action like this. demand action. call this number. you're supposed to call the number and it either connects you to the interest group r
as the national rifle association. he's a democrat, republican senator pat toomey of pennsylvania also has a virtually perfect record as far as the nra is concerned. they have now, though, come together and have come up with a compromise proposal to expand background checks for gun purchases in the united states. they spoke together just moments ago. >> let me just say good morning to all of you and i'm very, very proud to be here with my good friend pat toomey from my sister state of pennsylvania, west virginia, we're side-by-side and we come from states that have deep rooted cultures, as you know. and we've been very strong. and i also want to give special thanks to two people who aren't here today who have been invaluable to this process and have worked from the beginning trying to find common ground. and that is senator chuck schumer, my good friend, and my dear friend mark kirk. mark has been with me from the beginning. and has never left and chuck and his staff and all of them who have worked so hard, i thank everybody. pat will tell you. i also want to thank tom coburn. tom has been
who died or had to be hospitalized, but still the state did nothing. in pennsylvania, abortions past 24 weeks are illegal unless the health of the mother is at stake. this doctor offered illegal abortions, killing an unknown number of viable fetuses. it was whether the mothers could pay in cash. the untrained staff would allegedly induce labor then he would kill otherwise healthy babies. it's gruesome to think about, but he did it by snipping their spinal cords with a pair of scissors. he was not certified as an obstetrician or gynecologist, and he faces the death penalty. the fbi raided the women's medical society looking for evidence of illegal drug sales. a grand jury report what they found when they entered that clinic was utterly horrifying, blood on the floors, smell of urine in the air, a flea-infested cat roaming the halls. the evidence which is presented in this grand jury report, 281 pages of it, is sickening. according to a police detective, the doctor stated as many as 20% of the fetuses he aborted were probably older than 24 weeks. page 5 of the grand jury report details
of constitutional law and history at the university of pennsylvania and the author of "the spirit of the law" religious voices and the constitution in modern america". >>guest: thank you so much. >>host: "confederate reckoning" power and politics in the civil war south" the author is history professor stephanie mccurry from the university of pennsylvania. first of all, professor what is the painting on the front of your book? >> a civil war painting of a battleship going down the confederate flag going down in flames. it is not military history but it tells about what the book is about. >>host: professor stephanie mccurry give us the demographics of the south in 1860. >>guest: that is a crucial question because they went to war to make a new nation and they were smaller than the union to start with compared to the 10 million at the with the 22 but the military fact minutes is not paid as much attention to above 4 million wear black and in slaved. when it came to mobilize they did not have access to 10 million people but the white population of 6 million have for women and many were under age
day parade down pennsylvania avenue. extra police on the metro patrolling the platforms and trains. extra security at the airport. armed guards on capitol hill, outside federal buildings, and pennsylvania avenue in front of white house is still closed. it will be launching fireworks tonight at freedom plaza as part of the emancipation day festivities. i want to remind these are planned explosions to there's no need for alarm. >> of some of these are bound version got to have some of them taken part in the marathon. they told the boston tv station they became concerned about two .en on board they escorted the man off the plane. tonight, a firsthand account with easing a terror attack in person -- witnessing a terror attack. kris van cleave has their account. as the came back today, the whole family. something about being home that just felt safe. there was absolutely nothing save about their experience yesterday. >> just talking about it, i'm just getting a little upset. adult, we are going to die. i don't want to die today. >> sitting in the stands waiting for his wife cindy and da
of pennsylvania and later his research assistant. currently farber is a lecturer in urban studies at the university of pennsylvania and ph.d candidate having just completed his dissertation in american culture at the university of michigan. farber's work on culture has appeared in the journal, criticism, and other outlets, vibe and blander as well as on npr he was named to dell's inaugural inspire 100 list as a world changer for his use of technology in empowering social change. he is working on a biography of leonard freed. let us welcome these distinguished guests and learn how leonard freed's images of the historic march in august 1963 changed the ongoing worldwide struggle for civil rights. [applause] >> this is the day. how did this book get started? you would ask me and many people do and i say, it was president obama in his first term, he said, i am here because you all marched. not in america yet 50 years ago we did, what did i think america was? it was all things to me. my husband's home country, my new jewish family, sam freed and milton and ruth, robert and benjamin, le
already and police keeping a watchful eye. this morning's parade which runs along pennsylvania avenue will go on as scheduled, but nerves will become an easy and secure details will be on high alert. mayor vincent gray says there's butpecific threat, preliminary readiness plans have been put in place. >> we stand ready. >> the police chief says visitors will see a visible increase in police presence today and those reminders are evident already. >> i cannot do anything about it and it's our country. hopefully, the capital as well protected. >> armed officers close off pennsylvania avenue pedestrian traffic. the pentagon also added more officers in and outside the building. metro transit k-9 units are expecting areas at metro stations. >> we need to do this until we have enough information to feel comfortable there is no potential connection to washington. trucks here live, mpd are towing cars that moorpark and have been parked overnight inside the closed off perimeter for the parade. electronic signs are posted and asking people to report any suspicious activity. even with all the ale
interesting advertisement that struck me was in a january 20, 1776 issue of the pennsylvania ledger your here we have 10 days after the first publication of thomas paine's common sense, one of the first advertisement for common sense. there it is. what was interesting to me about this particular edition is that in the same newspaper is another advertisement for an for a new n of common sense, which suggests just how quickly this pamphlet was moving. which brings me to the into the history discovery. no taxation without representation, that argument springs to life in newspapers. at may 10, 1764 issue of the pennsylvania gazette. on page two is one paragraph that details the forthcoming sugar act. in that article, it says a scheme of taxation that has been praises debated in the parlor, whether they have the power to lay such attacks on the colonies which has no representative from parliament and determined in the affirmative. what's also interesting is this is where you get the first and teaser for the forthcoming stamp act that we know so well. besides is an internal tax was cut off come you
. that is the finish line where the bombs went off eight days ago. here in washington, pennsylvania avenue in front of the white house re-opened to pedestrian traffic. it was closed to pedestrians after monday's attacks. it's been closed to cars by the way since the oklahoma city bombing. again, the price of terrorism. we'll be right back after this. vo: from the classic lines to the elegant trim in each and every piece, bold will make your reality >>> welcome back to "hardball." alleged marathon bomber dzhokhar tsarnaev is upgraded in fair condition now. he's in fair condition. he was in serious. today at a boston hospital. while the investigation continues into what motivated his attack last week. in a moment we're going to find out what investigators are learning about the wife of tamerlan, that's his older brother. right now, let's go to the information from wnbc's chief investigative reporter jonathan d dienst. the survivor, being out there all alone. two brothers operating alone, technically, and also apparently ideologically. they were picking up their radicalization over the internet. not t
off eight days ago. here in washington, pennsylvania avenue in front of the white house as reopened to pedestrian traffic. it was closed to pedestrians after monday's attacks. yeah, i'm looking to save, but i'm not sure which policy is right for me. you should try our coverage checker. it helps you see if you have too much coverage or not enough, making it easier to get what you need. [ beeping ] these are great! [ beeping ] how are you, um, how are you doing? i'm going to keep looking over here. probably a good idea. ken: what's a good idea? nothing. with coverage checker, it's easy to find your perfect policy. >>> welcome back to "hardball." alleged marathon bomber dzhokhar tsarnaev is upgraded in fair condition now. he's in fair condition. he was in serious. today at a boston hospital. while the investigation continues into what motivated his attack last week. in a moment we're going to find out what investigators are learning about the wife of tamerlan, that's his older brother. right now, let's go to the information from wnbc's chief investigative reporter jonathan dienst. than
, pennsylvania avenue in front of the white house as reopened to pedestrian traffic. it was closed to pedestrians after monday's attacks. it's been closed to cars, by the way, since the oklahoma city bombing. again, the price of terrorism. we'll be right back after this. . governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. this is awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is, business pro. yes, it is. go national. go like a pro. by the armful? by the barrelful? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> welcome back to "hardball." alleged marathon bomber dzhokhar tsarnaev is upgraded in fair condition now. he's in fair condition. he was in serious. today at a boston hospital. while the investigation continues into what motivated his attack last week. in a moment we're going to find out
to be an awful crash if it didn't. you couldn't tell that story about pennsylvania station. for all its splendor, one person described it as reducing your tray two-minute stop from the long island city to robbery new jersey. terminal suggests a destination and has been make it wait to new york since 1913 in the city's gateway to the continent. to those of us, john didion wrote this, to those who came from places for grand central's patient was a radio program, new york was no mere city. this sudden infant atli romantic notion, the mysterious nexus of love than money and power, the shining perishable treatments of. i'm not sure how major event for. i don't, but every saturday morning on cbs radio, an announcer would thomists it always seeks its target, shining rails in every part of our great country are aimed at grand central station, part of the greatest 80 shonda denied that it forces a fantastic metropolis day and night, trains rush towards the hudson river, speech on its eastern bank or 140 miles, flashed briefly by the long red wrote of houses south of 125th street, dive into the two and ha
to buy it from senator toomey in pennsylvania, and he has a gun for sale and i want to buy it. the law today for me to by enter state, from west virginia to pennsylvania. mr. toomey would have to send that firearm to a licensed dealer in west virginia and i have to have a background check done before i can take possession of that. so we're not creating new law. all we're seeing is if you go to a gun show there will be background checks for all guns. if you buy on the internet there will be a background check where it's in state or out of state. this is basically a criminal and a mental background check. a criminal and a mental background check. and that criminal and mental brown check is you have to have been found guilty by a court that you are a criminal or found mentally insane by a court. that you should not be able to buy a gun. that's all. so all this talk is just falsehood. if you're a law-abiding gun owner, a proud gun owner and like shooting and go hunting with your friends and family, we do not infringe on any individual transfer. so if it's not a commercial transaction, indi
the scrap booking club, her parents said no way. they took the school in milford, pennsylvania, to court. >> that was hard. it was difficult not being able to play with some of the girls i had been playing with for years. >> reporter: alexis and her younger sister megan were forced to sit out all activities. >> even if it meant the girls not being able to play sports. >> even if it meant they had to sacrifice their sports and clubs that they loved so much. giving up your constitutional rights just because you can doesn't mean you should. >> reporter: it is a decision faced by parents across the country as random drug testing once reserved for olympic, college and high school athletes becomes a fact of life for kids in their early teens, even preteens. today school districts in at least nine states require it from their middle schoolers. >> i would argue as a school administrator who sees these kids day after day, it is helpful for them to have a reason to say no. >> are you still behaving? okay. >> reporter: back at pleasant middle school, he isn't just worried about getting students to
children. 15 years of age. university of pennsylvania, 3 years. a specific university bs administration. grossman associate, honolulu marketing distribution and consulting firm for medical manufacturers. owner 25 years. autism sie of hawaii president 3 years. autism society of america president and ceo 1 1/2 years and currently. lee grossman. born new jersey, wife, marie. 4 children. 53 years of age. republican. trenton state college va business. u.s. house of representatives new jersey fourth district including parts of ocean counties 26 years and currently. elected at 26 years of age. coalition for autism research and education. cochair with congress man mike doyle of pennsylvania. author of legislative acts autism statistics, surveillance, research and epidemiology. honors, several including autism society of america congressional hero award. christopher smith. >> before we leave the subject on whether or not vaccines cause autism, which is a commonly held view, there is a division particularly on the drug the mare sol. and it should be noted that in the november december issue of of
right now, why is he doing this? he faces reelection in three years in a swing state, pennsylvania. he's got to be making some calculations when it comes to the political capital he's expending. >> i think you said the key word, swing state. pennsylvania is not one of those hard-nosed republican states. it can go either way. he might be trying to appeal to the suburban voters. >> what is your thought here? does he lose his a rating from the nra? >> well, you know, the nra has been playing quite an interesting game. its reaction to this latest proposal is kind of mild. president obama probably said exactly the right thing. he said in his statement, this is not my bill. of course he's considered say it an by so many hard-nosed republicans. what there seems to be in this behind the scenes effort to get as little damage as possible. >> that vote in the senate today. thank you so much, bob franken. >>> other news going on around american. chicago store owner brought a bat to a gun fight and won it. he repeatedly swung even as the gunman continued to fire at him. the violent struggle ended w
wages on. across the country today, from atlanta to indiana and pennsylvania, people rallied to demand tougher gun laws. >> a background check is just a baseline common sense thing to do. >> this is a public safety issue. >> reporter: but some gun rights advocates protested against new laws. >> please, don't attack our rights as citizens. we're here. we're law-abiding citizens and we're being the ones victimized for this. >> reporter: but it is this woman whose voice may resonate the most. >> as you pced, i'm the pr >> reporter: for first time ever, the president turned over his weekly address to a private citizen, francine wheeler is a grieving newtown parent. >> david and i have two sons, our younger son, ben, age 6, was murdered in his first grade classroom on december 14th, exactly four months ago this weekend. >> reporter: wheeler was among the newtown families who spent the week on capitol hill, pressing congress to act and working in concert with the white house, going senator to senator, the wheelers and other parents shared their stories. the conversations helped persuade the
there we should mention he was pennsylvania's only president. >> from lancaster. >> we will be visiting the home he built in lancaster, pennsylvania, as the segment continues. as a reminder, we'd like you to be involved. it's more fun when you ask questions. you can do that by calling us, 202-5373-5580. and you can tweet us using the #firstlady or post-it on facebook and we'll take your questions. there was a reading about a pegnalian between the uncle and niece and he was determined to shape her into a proper woman. >> he took very good care -- he had a very affectionate relationship with her. he loved her dearly. she loved him dearly. he was like a father figure to her. and he sent her to the best schools. she had the best of really everything. buchanan did very well for himself. he made a lot of money. so money was not an object. he could have just about anything that he wanted. and he saw to it she was trained to be exactly what she was, a brilliant social success. >> one of the influences on her education was when her uncle was appointed ambassador to great britain, her home countr
, and then sit back and watch creation be destroyed? these pennsylvania ipo members are practicing what they preach. they bicycle 200 miles from state college, pennsylvania to washington, stopping at churches along the way. they are here to lobby congress to strengthen environmental laws. john is a professor of history and religious studies at penn state. >> you talk to people about their major faith experiences. something like 90% of people will think about something that happened to them out in the woods, on mountain somewhere. somewhere along the beach. something about the natural environment, the environment around us right now. that really speaks to people. and speaks to us about, of a higher power. >> the green muslim board members meet once a week to discuss teachin from the koran about protecting the earth. sara says the prophet mohammed was a tree hugger literally because he actually hugged a tree after he heard it wailing. >> it just shows so much about his character as a compassionate being and it helps me be more compassionate and to really live more lightly in this world. >
on the pennsylvania border is a battlefield. juice out.k the >> in 2010, robert lost an entire crop of nectarines. his appeals continue to suffer. -- his fields continue to suffer. >> look at how far we are into the apple. that is what our problem is. that is why this is such a problem. it was speeches this week. it wants soybeans next week. it jumps from crop to crop. >> he is determined to beat the bugs but fears government cuts made slow down vital research. he is also bracing himself for colonies that appear to have survived the mild winter. they are expected back in force this summer. >> now to a familiar face which will soon be featured on the bank of england's new 5 pound note. it was announced sir winston churchill will be on the currency starting in 2016. along with his portrait will be his famous quotation. movies, ando the members of the british royal family had quite an inventor today when they visited the home of harry potter. the duchess of cambridge and prince harry went to warner brothers studios north of london where the movies were made. the bbc was there with them. do stranged and y
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